Analog

Brenda Romero’s award-winning and critically-acclaimed analog works are one-of-a-kind installations which are at the intersection of systemic narrative, documentary and complicity.

UPCOMING EXHIBITIONS

Síochán Leat (aka The Irish Game) is on exhibit at the Strong Museum of Play in Rochester, NY through 2014.

Train is on exhibit at the Museum of Design in Atlanta through September 2013.

RECENT WORK

PreConception (pregame notgame)

PreConception6PreConception (pregame notgame) is a game without rules. It represents the neutral state game designer’s mind as he or she considers the possibility space of a new game. It makes visible the radically shifting possibility space within the context of all possible permutations of play. Infinite at first, each selection changes the opportunities and play afforded by the remaining conceptual space. A die introduces chance. Counters introduce economy. Each selection constrains the possibility space of an emerging game further until the game is revealed.

The mere presence of pieces provokes people toward an idea and a constructed possibility space all their own.

Game Designer: Brenda Romero

Release Date: February 6, 2013

  • Testing: John Romero
  • Thanks to: John Romero, John Sharp

THE MECHANIC IS THE MESSAGE

The Mechanic is the Message, a critically acclaimed analog game series by Brenda Romero, captures and expresses difficult experiences through the medium of a game. Much like photographs, paintings, literature and music are capable of transmitting the full range of the human experience from one human to another, so too can games. Due to their interactivity, the installation suggests that games are capable of a higher form of communication, one which actively engages the participant and makes them a part of the experience rather than a passive observer.

The Mechanic is the Message is composed of six separate non-digital games that experiment with the traditional notion of the word “game”.

  • The New World, 2008
  • Síochán leat (aka “The Irish Game”), 2009
  • Train, 2009
  • One Falls for Each of Us – in prototype
  • Mexican Kitchen Workers – in prototype
  • Cité Soleil – in concepting

Unlike traditional games, these works are one-of-a-kind installations. They have appeared at many conferences, galleries and museums. For additional information, please contact Brenda.

TALKS

CREDITS

The New World, 2008

The New World is a game I made on the spot for my daughter to teach her about the slave trade.

Game Designer: Brenda Romero
Release Date: February 2008

  • Testing: Maezza Brathwaite

Train, 2009

Train explores complicity within systems. It also asks two questions, “Will people blindly follow the rules?” and “Will people stand by and watch?”

Game Designer: Brenda Romero
Release Date: April 29, 2009

  • Design Confidante and Sounding Board: Ian Schreiber
  • Testing: Christopher Schmidt, Michelle Menard, Laura Beukema, Ian Schreiber, Darren Malley, Tyler Hawley
  • Thanks to: Ian Schreiber, John Sharp, Ian Bogost, John Romero, David Dirlam, Rabbi Belzer, Steve Meretzky, David Fox, Dan Cook, Jason Rohrer

Síochán Leat (aka The Irish Game)

Síochán Leat is the story of my family’s history beginning with the Cromwellian invasion of Ireland.

Game Designer: Brenda Romero
Release Date: June 8, 2009

  • Testing: Ian Brathwaite, Ian Schreiber, Christopher Schmidt, David McDonough
  • Thanks to: Paddy Donovan, Michael Collins, Ian Schreiber, Ian Brathwaite, John Sharp, John Romero, Ian Currie, Connor Scott, Anne Dirlam, David Dirlam, Dominique Elliot

One Falls for Each of Us

Game Designer: Brenda Romero
Release Date: TBD (This game is not yet released)

  • Testing: John Romero
  • Thanks to: John Romero, John Sharp, Ian Bogost

Mexican Kitchen Workers

Game Designer: Brenda Romero
Release Date: TBD (This game is not yet released)

Cité Soleil

Game Designer: Brenda Romero
Release Date: TBD  (This game is not yet released)

OTHER ANALOG WORKS

Two

Game Designers: Brenda Romero and John Romero
Release Date: TBD (This game is not yet released)

  • Testing: Anonymous
  • Thanks to: Anonymous, Kim McAuliffe, Dan McAuliffe